Turning Academic Research Into Public Engagement

2016-06-12

In the eyes of the public, academic research is not innovative or engaging, nor does it create an impact on society. One renowned 2007 study claimed that 50 percent of academic papers are read only by their authors and journal editors, and 90 percent are never cited, which signifies that no one finds them useful. How can we translate faculty’s research into information that’s relevant and valuable to the public discourse? During my tenure as Dean of JIBS in Sweden, our answer was to create a new blogging platform called Vertikals.

I led the project and championed it across the university. Emil Danielsson, who was experienced in entrepreneurship, business development, and media promotion, serves as the school’s marketing and PR agent; as a former “placebranding” consultant for the city of Jönköping, he also was familiar with the role that JIBS and the university play in our city. Finally, Charlotta Mellander, a professor of economics at JIBS and a visiting faculty member at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto, was one of our first and most prolific early bloggers— and, as it turned out, the force behind our first viral post.

Read the full article by the three of us in AACSB BizEd magazine May/June issue 2016:

http://www.bizedmagazine.com/archives/2016/3/features/academic-research-into-public-engagement


JIBS Sets a Record for Sweden

2015-12-30

Once in a while, we must forget our Swedish modesty and take the streets (and the Internet) to boast loudly and publically about ourselves, especially when it demonstrates a hard-won achievement that we all can be proud of!

In this case, it’s the fact Jönköping International Business School (JIBS) has become the first and only business school in Sweden to achieve the distinction of being “double accredited.”  In 2015, JIBS received both theEQUIS and AACSB accreditations, an amazing feat, given that these two accreditations are both extremely difficult to earn and that we won them both in the very short period of time of a year.

Full story in my 27 December 2015 article “JIBS Sets a Record for Sweden” at www.vertikals.se – JIBS’ blog on entrepreneurship, renewal and ownership.


Bringing Business Schools into the STEM Era

2015-11-13

Gone are the days when an MBA generalist with a strong marketing education could fathom the potential of new businesses creating products and services to utilise STEM advances. Today’s managers need a solid business background but also the knowledge of the innovative potential deriving from their company’s progress in STEM fields…   … be aware of recent advancements in multiple fields, ranging from genome coding via nano-enabled engineering to the explosive (and controversial) developments in artificial intelligence. In addition, considering that all of these subjects are moving at breathtaking speed, with the borders between them becoming hazier, we are already behind in preparing business students for the jobs that will exist in the future.

Full story in my September 2015 article “Bringing Business Schools into the STEM Era” in Global Focus, EFMD’s Busines Magazine. 2015, 3(3).


Into Africa

2015-07-23

Over the last few years my business schools, JIBS, has developed close relationships with two Eastern African countries, Ethiopia and Rwanda, to help increases their long-term “economic complexity” and thereby create widespread prosperity. At JIBS we call it our “Into Africa” strategic initiative and our means is higher education, especially PhD education.

In the latest issue of AACSB‘s BizEd magazine, I contributed an article about what we do and how we plan to increase our African engagement. I call it The PhD Effect:

http://www.bizedmagazine.com/archives/2015/3/features/the-phd-effect/

Last week a group of JIBS faculty and JIBS PhD candidates from Rwanda contributed to the 1st Conference in Kigali on Recent Trends in Economic Development, Finance and Management Research in Eastern Africa, co-hosted by JIBS and our partners in University of Rwanda.

The conference included some 70 paper presentations and attracted 200 contributors from several East African countries. Following this initiative, I took part of the 1st Business and Economic Regional Summit, again hosted by University of Rwanda and JIBS. At the end of the summit five business schools deans signed a MOU on The Entrepreneurship and Innovation for Development Initiative, which includes research collaboration, policy advice, education and private sector development in Rwanda, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Uganda (see photo below). JIBS has the pleasure and privilege to coordinate these activities and for us that means a further boost to our Into Africa strategic initiative. In fact it just became Into Africa 2.0.

2015-05-08 Signing the Entrepreneurship and Innovation for DevelopmentInitiative (EID)

All of this is in line with JIBS three guiding principles: International at Heart – Entrepreneurial in Mind – Responsible in Action.

 


Reflections on the future of business schools and elephants

2015-07-23

Higher Education today is like the parable of the 3 blind men and the elephant; there is an elephant in the room—and it’s a good thing; and we need to make changes of an elephantine nature.

Full text in my 28 January 2015 guest blog for European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) “Reflections on the future of business schools and elephants.

EFMD is a management development network serving over 800 member organisations from academia, business, public service and consultancy in 81 countries. It is a unique forum for information, research, networking and debate on innovation and best practice in management development.

 


The Renaissance We Need in Business Education

2014-07-03

Having taught at five business schools over several decades and served as Dean of two, I have come to a conclusion: The educational institutions where our future business leaders are being trained must be recalibrated and transformed dramatically.

Business education today is anachronistic in both how it is conducted and what its content focuses on. Our brick institutions have in no way caught up with what today’s technologies make possible in terms of virtual learning and individualized, customized instruction. More importantly, business education needs to evolve once again, revising its goals to educate leaders of the future who have a new set of skills: sustainable global thinking, entrepreneurial and innovative talents, and decision-making based on practical wisdom.

Full text in my 2 July 2014 article “The Renaissance We Need in Business Education” in Harvard Business Review.


Lessons needed to beat the computer

2014-06-20

Half of the jobs in the category “management, business and financial” involve complex perception and manipulation tasks, as well as creative and social intelligence, and will not be automated for a decade or two. This is a call to action. It suggests that business schools must refocus their curricula to provide students with the right skills so that they avoid being computerised out of the future.

Full text in my 18 June 2014 article “Lessons needed to beat the computer” in Financial Times.